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CFS Trustees

Covenant Fellowship Scotland is registered with OSCR as
Scottish Charity SC043628.

Trustees of the charity are:

Rev Professor Andrew McGowan 
(Chairman)
Rev Richard Buckley
Rev Mike Goss
Rev Ian Murdo Macdonald
Mr Kenneth Mackenzie
Rev Mark Malcolm
Rev Ann McCool
Rev Hector Morrison
Rev Colin Strong

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strategy document 2015 june cropped 2

 

 

 

 Covenant Fellowship Scotland Strategy Document

You can download this as a PDF document that can be read on most computers & devices by clicking here

Introduction (access the full article by clicking the "read more" button below)

Covenant Fellowship Scotland believes that the Church of Scotland is moving away from its roots in Scripture and the Westminster Confession of Faith. We believe that the time has come to draw together those in the Church who believe that the Scriptures, in their entirety, are the Word of God and must provide the basis for everything we believe and do. Our vision is nothing less than the reformation and renewal of the Church of Scotland, in accordance with the Word of God and by the empowering of his life-giving Spirit.

In light of the above, Covenant Fellowship Scotland deeply regrets the decision taken by the 2015 General Assembly of the Church of Scotland to permit those in same-sex civil partnerships to serve as ministers and deacons within the Church. In doing so, the Church is contravening both Scripture and our Confession of Faith, as was made clear by many who spoke clearly and graciously during the Assembly debate. We call on the Church of Scotland to repent of this unbiblical decision and to seek forgiveness from God, who alone sets moral standards and whose voice on this matter is clearly heard in the Scriptures.

We do this as a body of believers who ourselves need, receive and are dependent upon the redeeming grace of God on a daily basis, conscious as we are of our own individual and collective besetting sins. We do so also as those who believe that the blessings of the Gospel of the Lord Jesus are freely available to all irrespective of gender, race, sexual orientation or any other human characteristic and we desire to fellowship, as Jesus did, with all broken women and men who desire to submit themselves to his authority as Lord and Saviour.

We know that the Assembly’s decision has caused great pain and sorrow throughout the Church and that many people are prayerfully considering how to respond. Some feel that the only way to protest is to leave the Church of Scotland. Some ministers, elders, members and adherents have done so already and more will follow. While respecting that position, our vision is to remain within the Church in order to seek its reformation from within. We hope and pray that the Church can be brought back to its roots in the Bible and the reformed faith and it is our intention to work tirelessly for the realisation of that goal.

Attachments:
Download this file (CFS_Strategy_Document_11_06_2015.pdf)CFS_Strategy_Document_11_06_2015.pdf[Includes Plan of Action, Short, Medium & Long Term Strategy]219 kB

This print off & sign version of the Covenant Fellowship Declaration provides the opportunity for multiple people to declare their support for the CFS declaration statement:

I believe that the Church of Scotland is moving away from its roots in Scripture and the Westminster Confession of Faith.  I believe that the time has come for the creation of a ‘Covenant Fellowship’ within the Church.  This Covenant Fellowship will draw together those who believe that the Scriptures, in their entirety, are the Word of God and must provide the basis for everything we believe and do.  This vision is nothing less than the reformation and renewal of the Church of Scotland, in accordance with the Word of God and by the empowering of his life-giving Spirit.

The signing sheet is available in Microsoft Word & PDF formats.

Please return completed forms to:  Covenant Fellowship, Church Office, Margaret Street, Inverness, IV1 1LU

You can, of course, individually sign online using the form on the Contact page here.

Attachments:
Download this file (Covenant Fellowship Declaration.doc)Covenant Fellowship Declaration.doc[Covenant Fellowship Declaration to print off and sign - Word]35 kB
Download this file (Covenant Fellowship Declaration.pdf)Covenant Fellowship Declaration.pdf[Covenant Fellowship Declaration to print off and sign - PDF]14 kB

what does the bible teach homosexualityAuthor: Kevin DeYoung from thegospelcoalition.org ,

author of "What Does the Bible Really Teach about Homosexuality?" available here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bible-Really-Teach-About-Homosexuality/dp/1783592877

 

For evangelicals who lament last Friday’s [US] Supreme Court decision, it’s been a hard few days. We aren’t asking for emotional pity, nor do I suspect many people are eager to give us any. Our pain is not sacred. Making legal and theological decisions based on what makes people feel better is part of what got us into this mess in the first place. Nevertheless, it still hurts.

There are many reasons for our lamentation, from fear that religious liberties will be taken away to worries about social ostracism and cultural marginalization. But of all the things that grieve us, perhaps what’s been most difficult is seeing some of our friends, some of our family members, and some of the folks we’ve sat next to in church giving their hearty “Amen” to a practice we still think is a sin and a decision we think is bad for our country. It’s one thing for the whole nation to throw a party we can’t in good conscience attend. It’s quite another to look around for friendly faces to remind us we’re not alone and then find that they are out there jamming on the dance floor. We thought the rainbow was God’s sign (Gen. 9:8-17).

If you consider yourself a Bible-believing Christian, a follower of Jesus whose chief aim is to glorify God and enjoy him forever, there are important questions I hope you will consider before picking up your flag and cheering on the sexual revolution. These questions aren’t meant to be snarky or merely rhetorical. They are sincere, if pointed, questions that I hope will cause my brothers and sisters with the new rainbow themed avatars to slow down and think about the flag you’re flying.

1. How long have you believed that gay marriage is something to be celebrated?

2. What Bible verses led you to change your mind?

3. How would you make a positive case from Scripture that sexual activity between two persons of the same sex is a blessing to be celebrated?

4. What verses would you use to show that a marriage between two persons of the same sex can adequately depict Christ and the church?

5. Do you think Jesus would have been okay with homosexual behavior between consenting adults in a committed relationship?

6. If so, why did he reassert the Genesis definition of marriage as being one man and one woman?

7. When Jesus spoke against porneia what sins do you think he was forbidding?

8. If some homosexual behavior is acceptable, how do you understand the sinful “exchange” Paul highlights in Romans 1?

9. Do you believe that passages like 1 Corinthians 6:9 and Revelation 21:8 teach that sexual immorality can keep you out of heaven?

10. What sexual sins do you think they were referring to?

11. As you think about the long history of the church and the near universal disapproval of same-sex sexual activity, what do you think you understand about the Bible that Augustine, Aquinas, Calvin, and Luther failed to grasp?

12. What arguments would you use to explain to Christians in Africa, Asia, and South America that their understanding of homosexuality is biblically incorrect and your new understanding of homosexuality is not culturally conditioned?

13. Do you think Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama were motivated by personal animus and bigotry when they, for almost all of their lives, defined marriage as a covenant relationship between one man and one woman?

14. Do you think children do best with a mother and a father?

15. If not, what research would you point to in support of that conclusion?

16. If yes, does the church or the state have any role to play in promoting or privileging the arrangement that puts children with a mom and a dad?

17. Does the end and purpose of marriage point to something more than an adult’s emotional and sexual fulfillment?

18. How would you define marriage?

19. Do you think close family members should be allowed to get married?

20. Should marriage be limited to only two people?

21. On what basis, if any, would you prevent consenting adults of any relation and of any number from getting married?

22. Should there be an age requirement in this country for obtaining a marriage license?

23. Does equality entail that anyone wanting to be married should be able to have any meaningful relationship defined as marriage?

24. If not, why not?

25. Should your brothers and sisters in Christ who disagree with homosexual practice be allowed to exercise their religious beliefs without fear of punishment, retribution, or coercion?

26. Will you speak up for your fellow Christians when their jobs, their accreditation, their reputation, and their freedoms are threatened because of this issue?

27. Will you speak out against shaming and bullying of all kinds, whether against gays and lesbians or against Evangelicals and Catholics?

28. Since the evangelical church has often failed to take unbiblical divorces and other sexual sins seriously, what steps will you take to ensure that gay marriages are healthy and accord with Scriptural principles?

29. Should gay couples in open relationships be subject to church discipline?

30. Is it a sin for LGBT persons to engage in sexual activity outside of marriage?

31. What will open and affirming churches do to speak prophetically against divorce, fornication, pornography, and adultery wherever they are found?

32. If “love wins,” how would you define love?

33. What verses would you use to establish that definition?

34. How should obedience to God’s commands shape our understanding of love?

35. Do you believe it is possible to love someone and disagree with important decisions they make?

36. If supporting gay marriage is a change for you, has anything else changed in your understanding of faith?

37. As an evangelical, how has your support for gay marriage helped you become more passionate about traditional evangelical distinctives like a focus on being born again, the substitutionary sacrifice of Christ on the cross, the total trustworthiness of the Bible, and the urgent need to evangelize the lost?

38. What open and affirming churches would you point to where people are being converted to orthodox Christianity, sinners are being warned of judgment and called to repentance, and missionaries are being sent out to plant churches among unreached peoples?

39. Do you hope to be more committed to the church, more committed to Christ, and more committed to the Scriptures in the years ahead?

40. When Paul at the end of Romans 1 rebukes “those who practice such things” and those who “give approval to those who practice them,” what sins do you think he has in mind?

Food for thought, I hope. At the very least, something to chew on before swallowing everything the world and Facebook put on our plate.

Note: An earlier version of this post had the questions in paragraph format rather than enumerated. The content is still the same. Readers interested in studying what the Bible teaches about homosexuality may be interested in checking out my new book on that theme.

Taken from http://www.thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/kevindeyoung/2015/07/01/40-questions-for-christians-now-waving-rainbow-flags/